Lenovo Technical Support Blogger Widgets
Home Our Website Post a Qusetion Here Plan

LENOVO - Restore to factory default settings



Lenovo Inspiron users may encounter the need to restore default settings. Restoring default settings inLenovo laptops is quite complicated without proper guidance. The paragraphs below will discuss the variouslaptop computer shortcut keys which control the hardware which relates to this issue. There are hundreds of operating systems out there, such as Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows XP, and this method of restoration can be applied to most of them. Keys like F8, F11 and CTRL will be used to bring back the default settings. The process should only take 10 minutes maximum.

For Windows XP

If your operating system is XP, press the CTRL and F11 keys simultaneously when you see the Lenovo logo after turning on the laptop, and follow the instructions on the screen.
· Put the computer on.
· When the Lenovo screen appears, press and hold the CTRL and F11 key simultaneously on the keyboard, then release them both at the same time. The Lenovo PC Restore by Symantec window appears.
· Click the Restore button or press the key to highlight Restore and press the key.
A caution message appears, advising that all data will be lost.


· Click the Confirm button, or press the key to highlight Confirm and press the key.

The Progress window appears. Once the process has begun, Lenovo PC the restore usually takes only 8 to 10 minutes to complete. When the restore is complete, the message 'The system recovery process was successful' appears.
· Click the Finish button or press the key to highlight Finish and press the key.

The computer will restart.

For Vista or Win 7

If your operating system is VISTA / Win 7, press the F8 key when you see the Lenovo logo. It will take you to the advanced boot menu options, which include 'Repair your Computer'. Select that option and enter your password if asked, then you will see a list of options like 'system restore' and 'command prompt'. The last option says 'Lenovo PC restore', or something along those lines. Select that option and follow the instructions on the screen.
If in both cases, the Factory default doesn't work, then your laptop's factory image defaults partition has vanished . In this case you will have to reinstall the operating system with the CD or DVD shipped along with the laptop. Follow the link below to install windows XP Pro on your own.


· Start the computer.


· As the computer starts, press the F8 key until the Advanced Boot Options menu appears on the screen.


· Press the down arrow to select Repair Your Computer on the Advanced Boot Options menu, then press Enter.


· Specify the language settings that you want, and then click Next.


· Log in as a user who has administrative credentials, and then click OK.


· Click Lenovo Factory Image Restore.


· In the Lenovo Factory Image Restore window, click Next.


· Click to select the check box for Yes, reformat hard drive and restore system software to factory condition.


· Click Next. The computer is restored to the default factory configuration.


· When the restore operation is completed, click Finish to restart the computer.
Read More...

Any Kind of  Lenovo Problems Call Us
+1-855-517-2433 (Toll Free)

wtat is LCD Display Monitor Problem

 LCD Display Monitor Problem

Laptop Screen Dim, Blank Or Black



Note that these steps correspond with decision points on the flowchart and are reached through the interactive diamond symbols. The text below cannot be read sequentially.

Do you see a live BIOS splash screen? Most laptops will display a manufacturer splash screen with their brand name, Lenovo, Toshiba, Acer, Sony, etc, before launching into windows. Even those that don't should flash a text screen with the BIOS maker (AMI, Award, Phoenix) in the corner, and a message telling you what key combination to use to access the BIOS Setup screens. A biometric screen prompting you to scan a fingerprint before the system will boot counts as a BIOS splash screen here. If the screen lights up with anything, a graphic or text, it means that the basic display I/O system is functioning.

Return to Diagnostic Chart

Is the screen live if you connect an external display? All notebooks should support an external monitor, usually with a high-density D-Shell 15 pin VGA connector, but some might feature a DVI connector instead. It's a vital part of laptop display troubleshooting to determine if a known good external monitor can be used. Newer laptops don't keep the external connector live by default, and some don't allow for simultaneous display on both the LCD and an external monitor. You can toggle between the notebook screen (which isn't working) and the external display with an Fn key combination. The Fn key is located at the lower left of the keyboard, normally between the CTRL and the ALT key. Toshiba uses Fn-F5 to toggle between the laptop LCD and an external display. IBM or Lenovo uses FN-F7, Acer varies with the model, using Fn-F5, Fn-F3, Fn-F8, Sony Fn-F7, Lenovo Fn-F8, HP or Compaq, Fn-F4. There are variations with the age of the laptop and not all manufacturers have standardized on a key combo across the whole range, but you can usually figure it out from the little graphics on the function keys that line the top of the keyboard.

Return to Diagnostic Chart

Can you hear any sound from the hard drive or fans? If you can't get any life at all on the laptop lcd or the external display, it's entirely possible that the problem goes deeper than a video issue. Signs of life include the cooling fan blowing, the hard drive spinning up, any LED activity beyond the LED indicating AC power is attached or battery charging. If the system is powering up, even going through boot as you can often tell by the level of hard drive activity demonstrated by the sound or the hard drive LED flashing, with no life on the LCD or external monitor, you have a board level failure. It could be the video processor failed due to overheating, you can try taking apart and reassembling the laptop body on the chance there is a bus connector failure (it's only a possibility on some models), but you don't have to bother inspecting the wiring to to laptop screen or connections in the lid since the external monitor bypasses all of these.

Return to Diagnostic Chart

Do you see a very dim desktop image? Can you see a ghost-like image of your desktop that is functional, ie, one that changes if you drag an icon, launch a program or disappears if you shut down. Standard LCDs produce very little visible light on their own, they require the Cold Cathode Fluorescent Light (CCFL) to light the screen from behind. The fluorescent tube is normally located at the top of the screen, and a bright reflective surface distributes the light across the back of the LCD, so it can shine through the liquid crystals of the liquid crystal display, which only transmit red, green or blue (RGB).
Read More...

Any Kind of  Lenovo Problems Call Us
+1-855-517-2433 (Toll Free)

Troubleshooting Lenovo Laptop Wireless Connections



Note that these steps correspond with decision points on the flowchart and are reached through the interactive diamond symbols. The text below cannot be read sequentially.

Does the laptop software see the wireless network? Does the laptop operating system software see the wireless network you are trying to connect to? Many notebooks come equipped with a special manufacturer's configuration utility, such as lenovo's ConfigFree, in addition to standard OS connectivity software, like the "View Available Wireless Networks" option in modern Windows versions. In addition, there should be a little wireless icon in the system tray, which may flash a small bubble announcement when it connects or fails to connect. Floating the mouse pointer over the wireless icon in the system tray on a Windows desktop should show the name of the wireless connection (often a HEX address that looks like alphabet soup if not changed from the default), the speed (54 Mbps for 802.11G), the signal strength, and whether a connection to a router has been established. Note that a connection to a router does not imply a connection to the internet.

Manufacturer provided software can provide a much more accurate picture of relative router distances and signal strength. In some circumstances, especially public networks at hotels, campuses and coffee shops, your laptop may consistently choose to connect to a weak router or access point when stronger signals are available. The manufacturer software usually shows this much clearer than the five green signal strength bars of "View Available Wireless Networks."

Return to Diagnostic Chart

Is the external wireless switch, is so equipped, enabled? When a laptop won't connect to a wireless network, more often than not it's because the wireless adapter is switched off or disabled in software. As with volume controls for computer speakers, wireless networking can be disabled both manually and through software, and in more than one place. Most modern laptops come equipped with an manual slide switch on the front or side of the laptop that turns the wireless adapter on or off. There is is usually an LED associated with the switch that will be lit only when the laptop's wireless capability is on. However, the LED will remain lit even if the wireless has been disabled in software, it is a status indicator for the hardware switch only. The switch can easily be turned off by accident when picking up the laptop or even by a book or other table clutter coming into contact with the side of the notebook, so it's a very common problem.

The easiest place to tell if the laptop wireless adapter has been disabled through software is in Device Manager. One sure sign the adapter is disabled in software (or not operating properly) is if it doesn't appear in the system tray. If your laptop wireless adapter is discrete, a USB or PC card (PCMCIA) plug-in, shut down, make sure it's plugged in firmly, and reboot. Even if the wireless device is designed to be hot-swappable (plugged in while the laptop is turned on) it's better to shut down and do it, since this will give the operating system a chance to reset.
Read More...

Any Kind of  Lenovo Problems Call Us
+1-855-517-2433 (Toll Free)

Lenovo Laptop doesn't turn on and indicator lights don't turn on either.

Lenovo Laptop doesn't turn on and indicator lights don't turn on either.


Laptop appears completely dead, doesn't make a sound or flash any of the indicator lights when I try to turn it on. Charger is not the problem, as I have checked with another laptop and another charger.
Battery is not the problem, as I have tried to turn it on without the battery (only AC charger)
In detail:
The Laptop is a Toshiba Satellite P300-15D, about 2 or 3 years old with absolutely no hardware changes (and absolutely no physical damage. I almost never move it.)
I'm not sure how it powered off because I wasn't close to it when it did, but it had the battery in and was plugged in. I have another Toshiba laptop, which I used to check if it was a problem with the charger. The charger works fine, and I also tried with the charger the other laptop.
I have searched around quite a bit on the internet and tried the "remove battery and AC adaptor, then press power button for 30+ seconds, connect AC adaptor and try turning it on" technique with no success.
Read More...

Any Kind of  Lenovo Problems Call Us
+1-855-517-2433 (Toll Free)